Museum of Work & Culture Announces New Virtual Museum Tours

 

(WOONSOCKET, R.I.) – The Museum of Work & Culture, a division of the Rhode Island Historical Society, is excited to announce a new series of virtual tours for the public beginning Wednesday, December 2.

 

The hour-long tours will be hosted on Zoom each Wednesday at 10am & 2pm. Admission is free for RIHS members and $5 per connecting device for non-members. Tickets can be purchased by visiting rihs.org/buy-tickets/.

 

The Museum of Work & Culture tour will feature an experienced docent leading visitors through a dozen immersive exhibits using a combination of video, audio, and images. Themes will include the Industrial Revolution, child labor, immigration & nativism, Americanization, labor & unions, and life at the turn-of-the-century.

 

About the Museum of Work & Culture

The interactive and educational Museum of Work & Culture shares the stories of the men, women, and children who came to find a better life in Rhode Island’s mill towns in the late 19th- and 20th centuries. It recently received a Rhode Island Monthly Best of Rhode Island Award for its SensAbilities Saturdays all-ability program.

 

About the Rhode Island Historical Society

Founded in 1822, the RIHS, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is the fourth-oldest historical society in the United States and is Rhode Island’s largest and oldest historical organization. In Providence, the RIHS owns and operates the John Brown House Museum, a designated National Historic Landmark, built in 1788; the Aldrich House, built in 1822 and used for administration and public programs; and the Mary Elizabeth Robinson Research Center, where archival, book and image collections are housed. In Woonsocket, the RIHS manages the Museum of Work and Culture, a community museum examining the industrial history of northern Rhode Island and of the workers and settlers, especially French-Canadians, who made it one of the state’s most distinctive areas. 

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