May 31, 2019

Legislative Press Bureau at (401) 528-1743

           

 

This week at the

General Assembly

 

STATE HOUSE — Here are the highlights from news and events that took place in the General Assembly this week. For more information on any of these items visit http://www.rilegislature.gov/pressrelease

 

 

§  House OKs McEntee bill to extend statute of limitations for sexual abuse

The House of Representatives passed Rep. Carol Hagan McEntee’s (D-Dist. 33, South Kingstown, Narragansett) legislation (2019-H 5171A) that amends the state’s civil statute of limitations for childhood sexual abuse. The bill would extend the statute of limitations for victims of childhood sexual abuse from seven years to 35 years. The legislation would also extend to 35 years the statute of limitations for entities, individuals or organizations which caused or contributed to childhood sexual abuse through negligent supervision, conduct, concealment or other factors that enabled the abuse to occur.

Click here to see news release.

 

§  House passes Serpa bill that would compensate the wrongfully imprisoned
The House of Representatives passed legislation (2019-H 5329A) introduced by Rep. Patricia Serpa (D-Dist. 27, West Warwick, Coventry, Warwick) that would give compensation to innocent people who have spent time behind bars but were later released when new evidence shows they were not guilty. The measure now moves to the Senate, where similar legislation (2019-S 0701) has been introduced by Sen. Cynthia A. Coyne (D-Dist. 32, Barrington, Bristol, East Providence).
Click here to see news release.

 

§  Senate approves bill aimed at reducing nursing home staff turnover
The Senate approved legislation sponsored by Sen. Gayle L. Goldin (D-Dist. 3, Providence) to help reduce staff turnover at nursing homes to improve the quality of care. The legislation (2019-S 0144), which will now go to the House, directs managed care organizations to consult with the Executive Office of Health and Human Services to develop incentives for nursing homes that demonstrate lower direct-care staff turnover.
Click here to see news release.

§  Senate passes bill to ensure Narcan doesn’t present life insurance barrier
The Senate passed legislation sponsored by President of the Senate Dominick J. Ruggerio (D-Dist. 4, North Providence, Providence) to remove a barrier to accessing lifesaving anti-overdose medication. The bill (2019-S 0799 Sub Aaa) addresses a situation experienced by some individuals who obtained naloxone in Rhode Island, then had trouble getting life insurance.
Click here to see news release.

§  House OKs bill for kennel licenses for trainers who keep animals overnight

The House approved legislation (2019-H 5436Aaa) requiring for-profit animal trainers who keep animals overnight to obtain a kennel license. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Stephen R. Ucci (D-Dist. 42, Johnston, Cranston) does not apply to nonprofits or government agencies, and is meant to improve accountability and animal welfare.

§  Senate OKs Sosnowski bill banning gender ratings in health premiums
The Senate passed legislation (2019-S 0445A) introduced by Sen. V. Susan Sosnowski (D-Dist. 37, South Kingstown, New Shoreham) that would ban health insurers from utilizing the discriminatory practice known as gender rating, or routinely charging women and men different premiums for individual insurance. The measure now heads to the House of Representatives, where similar legislation (2019-H 5364) has been introduced by Rep. Katherine S. Kazarian (D-Dist. 63, East Providence).
Click here to see news release.

 

§  House OKs Casimiro bill that tracks academic performance of foster care youth

The House of Representatives gave approval to Rep. Julie A. Casimiro’s (D-Dist. 31, North Kingstown, Exeter) legislation (2019-H 5964A) that directs superintendents to create an annual report on the academic progress of foster care. According to the legislation, if the superintendent determines that foster care youth are disproportionately failing to meet academic standards or are subject to school discipline at a rate more than the overall student population, a remediation plan shall be included within the submitted annual report.

Click here to see news release.

 

§  Reps. Williams and Ranglin-Vassell introduce marijuana equity programs

Rep. Anastasia P. Williams (D-Dist. 9, Providence) has introduced several pieces of legislation (2019-H 6069, 2019-H 6070, 2019-H 6073) that seeks to remove barriers to persons of color or persons found to be disproportionately impacted by marijuana prohibition from entering into the cannabis industries.  The acts would ensure that a policy is implemented to promote an equitable distribution of licenses and certificates related to these industries.  Rep. Marcia Ranglin-Vassell (D-Dist. 5, Providence) has introduced similar legislation (2019-H 5795) that would establish a board and appropriates funds from the legislature to create a local cannabis equity program to help people who want to enter legal marijuana industries with state funding and technical assistance.

 

§  Rep. Lima bill would rename ‘Rhode Island T.F. Green International Airport’

Rep. Charlene M. Lima (D-Dist. 14, Cranston, Providence) has introduced legislation (2019-H 6149) that would rename T.F. Green State Airport to the Rhode Island T.F. Green International Airport.  Senate Majority Leader Michael J. McCaffrey (D-Dist. 29, Warwick) has introduced the companion legislation (2019-S 0855) in the Senate.

 

 

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For an electronic version of this and all press releases published by the Legislative Press and Public Information Bureau, please visit our Web site at www.rilegislature.gov/pressrelease.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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