Governor McKee Announces New Rhode Island Child Tax Rebate

 

Eligible Families Will Receive up to $250 Per Child for a Maximum of 3 Children

 

NEWPORT, RI Continuing his #RIMomentum Tour, Governor Dan McKee today announced the details of the new Rhode Island Child Tax Rebate, a state tax rebate of $250 per child for a maximum of three children. The program was created in the FY 23 budget signed by the Governor in June.

 

The Governor was joined for the announcement by members of the General Assembly, Newport Mayor Jeanne-Marie Napolitano, Tax Administrator Neena S. Savage, Acting Department of Human Services Director Yvette Mendez and Kathleen Burke, Executive Director of Newport Partnership for Families at an event at the Florence Gray Center in Newport.

 

“Our Administration is committed to delivering targeted tax relief to Rhode Islanders as we continue to build on our state’s economic momentum,” said Governor Dan McKee. “Supporting parents and their children with Rhode Island's new Child Tax Rebate is a sensible and critical way to keep our economy growing.”

 

The program will deliver child tax rebates of $250 per child, up to three children, for Rhode Island residents making up to $100,000 for an individual and $200,000 for joint filers. The program is expected to support nearly 115,000 Rhode Island families across the state.

 

No application is required. Rebate checks will be automatically issued to all eligible tax filers beginning in October 2022. Any Rhode Island resident who claimed at least one dependent child under the age of 18 (as of December 31, 2021) on their 2021 federal/state personal income tax return, within certain income thresholds, may be eligible. For details and the latest updates on the Child Tax Rebate, visit https://tax.ri.gov/ChildTaxRebate2022. Rhode Islanders will soon be able to track their rebate payment on that webpage.

 

“Fortunately, between federal funds and a one-time surplus, we were able to offer relief to Rhode Islanders in several ways, including this child tax credit that will be helpful to families during challenging times,” said Speaker of the House K. Joseph Shekarchi (D-Dist. 23, Warwick). “Getting this tax credit and other relief into the budget was a collaborative effort on the part of a lot of people who worked hard to come up with ways to give Rhode Islanders some financial relief.”

 

“We’ve seen substantial price increases in just about everything,” said Senate President Dominick J. Ruggerio (D-Dist. 4, North Providence, Providence). “This tax credit is another way the state can help families that are struggling with inflation by easing some of the burden for those families with a little bit of relief from the state at a time when prices are rising and belts are tightening.”

 

The Child Tax Rebate program will be administered by the Rhode Island Division of Taxation.

 

“We are happy to help the Governor provide financial aid to Rhode Island families at this critical time for the state’s economy. The Division of Taxation is working now on building the processes for getting this money to taxpayers as quickly as possible,” said Tax Administrator Neena S. Savage.

 

“Rhode Island’s FY2023 budget took steps to address the racial, political, social, economic, and environmental drivers of poor health. One of those important steps is providing a child tax rebate to working families,” said Acting Health and Human Services Secretary Ana Novais. “At a time when national inflation is high, and everything seems to cost more, this rebate will allow families to breathe a little sigh of relief.”

 

“Since its inception in 1990, Newport Partnership for Families has been rooted in connecting with non-profit members to collectively address issues impacting children and parents,” said Kathleen Burke, Executive Director, Newport Partnership for Families. “We are grateful for the Child Tax Rebate, funds which will allow families to either offer that little extra for their child or to play catch up on bills....every dollar counts.”

 

The Rhode Island Child Tax Rebate was created as part of the FY 2023 budget that was signed by Governor McKee in June. That budget includes millions of dollars in targeted tax relief for families, veterans, local businesses and older adults.

 
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